Sheepeater Cliff

ROF Yellowstone

April 08

Sheepeater Cliff

After seeing Mammoth Hot Springs... fantastic. Headed south on the upper west loop and came to sheepeater cliff. The Hex collumns were neat. A geological site for sure.

from wikipedia***

The Sheepeater Cliffs are a series of exposed cliffs made up of columnar basalt in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. The lava was deposited about 500,000 years ago during one of the periodic basaltic floods in Yellowstone Caldera, and later exposed by the Gardner River. The cliffs are noted as a textbook example of a basaltic flow with well defined joints and hexagonal columns. They were named after a sub-band of Western Shoshone known as Tukuaduka (sheep eaters). Many of the exposed cliffs are located along a steep inaccessible canyon cut by the Gardner near Bunsen Peak, but some of the cliffs located just off the Grand Loop Road can be reached by car.


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The Gardner River was flowing so beautiful through this site. Really clear mountain water along the alluvial meadow banks. Well,... can't pass this up so get out the fishing rod and let's see if there are any trout here. About 45 minutes later... no luck today. I've determined from other trout fishing streams in the west... Yellowstone is fished out. Too heavily fished. On the main rivers.... dozens - litterally... along every river. In the whole time spent at Yellowstone, only saw 2 people catch one trout each. it;s fished very hard by the guys that have $2,000 fishing gear & waders; they're everywhere.

But it was a beautiful place and glad I got to see it AND trout fish some on a good morning. A good start of a day.





















ROF Yellowstone

April 08

Sheepeater Cliff

After seeing Mammoth Hot Springs... fantastic. Headed south on the upper west loop and came to sheepeater cliff. The Hex collumns were neat. A geological site for sure.

from wikipedia***

The Sheepeater Cliffs are a series of exposed cliffs made up of columnar basalt in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. The lava was deposited about 500,000 years ago during one of the periodic basaltic floods in Yellowstone Caldera, and later exposed by the Gardner River. The cliffs are noted as a textbook example of a basaltic flow with well defined joints and hexagonal columns. They were named after a sub-band of Western Shoshone known as Tukuaduka (sheep eaters). Many of the exposed cliffs are located along a steep inaccessible canyon cut by the Gardner near Bunsen Peak, but some of the cliffs located just off the Grand Loop Road can be reached by car.

***

The Gardner River was flowing so beautiful through this site. Really clear mountain water along the alluvial meadow banks. Well,... can't pass this up so get out the fishing rod and let's see if there are any trout here. About 45 minutes later... no luck today. I've determined from other trout fishing streams in the west... Yellowstone is fished out. Too heavily fished. On the main rivers.... dozens - litterally... along every river. In the whole time spent at Yellowstone, only saw 2 people catch one trout each. it;s fished very hard by the guys that have $2,000 fishing gear & waders; they're everywhere.

But it was a beautiful place and glad I got to see it AND trout fish some on a good morning. A good start of a day.

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